What is the difference between trusts and other legal entities based on natural law, and ones based on statutory law?

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Statutory law consists of millions of laws. They change every year and are so numerous and complicated that they require well paid lawyers to keep up with them. They have created a whole industry of lawyers that parasite off society because of it. Such laws are generally designed to benefit the few at the expense of the many — the lawyers, the politicians, the big corporations, and the cabal’s favored interests. Legal entities set up under statutory law are subject to those millions of laws and require expensive and complicated legal expertise to defend them.

Common law, by contrast, has been around for millions of years, and will continue to be around for millions of years. It rarely changes. It’s basically, “Don’t lie, don’t steal, and don’t violate the rights of others.” It is the closest thing to natural law, or universal law, that is active in human affairs. It was the basis of the US court system until 1938. It is still the underlying authority and is now returning in force.

Trusts and legal instruments that are created under natural law have far greater freedoms. They are subject only to the natural law and are thus sovereign and immune from the ever-changing statutory laws. They can go on generation after generation, well into the Golden Age, and flourish, because they’re based on what is timeless.

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